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Les données statistiques indiquent que l'impuissance se produit au moins une fois dans la vie avec chaque homme. Oder beraten sie sich mit Ihrem Arzt.

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  • Pulsar391

    Pulsar391

    March 11, 2015, 4:50 am

    I never assumed that no women viewed the material, but the truth is that the majority of /r/jailbait's demographic is male. That's not sexist, it's a reasonable assumption. Looking at the posting guidelines on the subreddit's sidebar it seems that they've had issues with the posting of illegal images in the past, so it would be foolish to assume that they won't see more posted in the future. Furthermore from a legal standpoint, all it takes is one image to land this site in legal trouble. And I have no doubt that there are plenty of over zealous lawyers out there just waiting for their chance to take on a popular site (if only to make their name known).

    Reply

  • MrMakeveli

    MrMakeveli

    March 10, 2015, 1:36 pm

    I wish I had more reddit friends IRL because this would totally become an inside joke for us.

    I give people the benefit of the doubt as often as humanly possible. There is a psychological term or phrase for it, but the gist of it is that we are lenient on ourselves (oops i cut him off but i'm rreeaalllllyyy late) and assume the worst of other people (he cut me off the stupid mother fucker is the biggest douche i've ever encountered i bet he cuts everyone off everywhere he goes). I typically assume that it was an accident or fluke because I know when shit like that happens to me, it often is. Obviously this ignores straight up assholes, but I'd like to think there aren't as many of them as we're inclined to believe. Cheers.

    Reply

  • Whisper

    Whisper

    March 10, 2015, 5:54 am

    That would be relevant if we were punishing him for creating it.

    But we're not.

    Let's be honest, what we're really punishing him for is jerking off to it. For what he thought about it, and how he felt about it. We're not punishing him for having something. We're punishing him for being a pedophile.

    That's the problem with punishing someone for thinking something, instead of for doing something. It gives you *carte blanche* to go fishing through everyone's lives, their computers, their papers, their heads; because you're looking for "deviants". Not for the specific people who did a specific thing that we know happened. Not for people who did something, but for people who are something.

    Reply

  • flwombat

    flwombat

    March 10, 2015, 9:50 pm

    Wow, lotta exmos here today.

    I have an old friend who left the church recently.

    She's a woman, a mother of 3, married to a returned missionary that she met while attending BYU, living in a small town in Utah County, just down the road from her very Mormon parents, in an area where *everyone* around her is Mormon.

    She's brave as hell, is what I'm saying. If she can do it, you can do it.

    She's only a year or two into the process, and in a very difficult place. I've been out for a long time, and my perspective is that, though it takes time, the breaking-away process is totally worth it. I am willing to have people mad at me if it means I get to live honestly.

    FWIW, I grew up in Utah County (where the Krakauer book takes place lol) in a supah-mo family.

    I ditched the church shortly after moving out at age 17 to go to college. My folks freaked (mostly my mom) and wrote letters to practically everyone I had ever met telling them I was going apostate and to pray for me, etc. It effectively cut me off from anybody Mormon, so I suppose it backfired. I was left with no one to talk to but my new, non-Mormon college friends :)

    My parents barely spoke to me at all for a few years (not until I gave them a grandchild lol), and I lost complete track of all of my friends from my hometown/high school.

    Oddly enough, 15 years later I am rebuilding some of those old friendships in part because some of those same friends have since left the church.

    Everyone leaves differently, though. I was *really* mad when I left, probably because I really believed it for so long. My wife was raised Mormon as well, also in Utah, but she never believed it so leaving just meant no one was making her go through the motions any more; it wasn't emotionally wrenching.

    I also have a friend whose entire extended family left the church at once, and in scandal. His experience seems to have been a lot more traumatizing. :(

    Rambling stories aside, I think you should leave the church. My relationships with my family are not the same as they were, but they are relationships between adults who are being straight with one another. I can't imagine living any other way at this point.

    Another plus is that because I am the oldest, I believe my younger siblings (3 of the 4) had an easier time emotionally with leaving the church than I did, just because I went first. Proving to yourself that you can live with being honest about your beliefs feels good; being the example that gives others the courage to do the same feels better. :)

    Good luck.

    Reply

  • Peterabit456

    Peterabit456

    March 11, 2015, 3:58 am

    Grayson spoke the truth, even when he used the word 'holocaust.' That was enough to make those Republicans gag. They couldn't stomach it.

    3750 people are dying every month that real health care reform is delayed. If you extrapolate that number all the way back to when the Clintons proposed health care reform in the early 1990s, you get 500,000 to 750,000 premature deaths due to Republican obstruction of health care reform. Over 100,000 of those deaths have been children.

    Now, 500,000 to 750,000 deaths is not quite the same as 6 million Jews in WWII, but it is a huge number, and I think the term "Holocaust," is entirely appropriate to describe 500,000+ deaths. Especially since there is a very deliberate policy and ideology (calling health care reform evil socialism) that is responsible for those deaths.

    The one thing missed was that "Tort Reform," such as it has been under the Bushes, is a major part of the problem. Tort reform has made it much more difficult (almost impossible, actually) to sue when an insurance company denies you coverage. There was ~no such thing as denial because of 'preexisting conditions,' before tort reform, because the unfair, almost fraudulent way it is being used these days would have been denied by the courts, with triple damages awarded to the plaintiff, or to the surviving relatives.

    Reply

  • iammillion

    iammillion

    March 11, 2015, 6:21 am

    Re-read my post, that is just income from my job. I also wrote a book, consulting, etc. That's is just this year (in a "down economy")

    In prior years, I've made money off things like running websites, selling them, selling software, building computers, building and selling small businesses, etc.

    One quick example: in 2003 I did some consulting for a recovering "dot com" company and at the time there stock was around ~$5.00. It was a side job, so instead of cash I asked for part of my my pay in stock (as much as they would give me) and also was able to purchase their stock at a discount (using money from my day job). I was able to accumulate quite a bit of shares. I sold about half off for around ~$22 and still have the other half. Their stock is around $27 today. When I sold at $22 I made more on the sale then I did from my full time income that year.

    Another year I had a book deal bring in more income then my day job. All of that extra income goes directly into savings/investments.

    But like I said, there is no "one thing" that has been the "main" contributor. It's been a combination of a lot of smaller things over many years compounded by savings/investing. $25K here, $70K there, $10K there and it starts to add up.

    Reply

  • tuba_man

    tuba_man

    March 10, 2015, 1:11 pm

    Your hardware choices seem reasonable.

    Go with Windows Server 2003 or Server 2008. Small Business Server 2003/2008 offers a lot more extra stuff, and it's cheaper. There are more growth limitations (no backup domain controllers, etc), but it's easily upgradable for what I believe is the difference between SBS and Sever 200x.

    SBS is built for exactly that sort of sized company. I've got a client running SBS, and it serves them well. They like to avoid spending money at all costs. Most of my clients run Server 2003 Standard or Server 2008 Standard. The clients range between 3 users and 40 users.

    Chances are you're going to hate yourself if you make the mistake of using the client versions (XP/Vista). Yes, the server editions cost more, but you really shouldn't be building it with anything less.

    Under my company's managed service agreements, we cover almost everything on the network. Virus cleanup and workstation rebuilds are charged hourly, but otherwise, everything's covered under their monthly fee. There is one thing we will absolutely refuse to cover, and that's servers running on client OSes like XP and Vista. XP's limited to 10 incoming connections (though maybe just on file shares), there's no domain/centralized authentication, no management features, etc.

    In the event that Worst Practices are your thing, I'd say go with which ever one the client machines are running on. If this business isn't willing to pay for a server OS, it may as well be as compatible as possible.

    (I don't mean to come across rude, though I have the feeling I am anyway... I apologize if I am, but seriously, do yourself a favor and use Server 2003 or Server 2008.)

    Edit: Sorry, missed the client-side stuff. Can it wait for Windows 7? I'm not really a huge fan of Vista, but it works well these days. XP _has_ to be dying eventually, so it seems short-sighted to use that. I don't even really want to say "Buy XP for now and upgrade later", because every time I've suggested something like that, the last 3 words get forgotten. Recommendation: If everything is new, go with Server 2008 and Vista, or wait a month and go with Win 7 on the clients.

    Reply

  • iammillion

    iammillion

    March 10, 2015, 12:03 pm

    Re-read my post, that is just income from my job. I also wrote a book, consulting, etc. That's is just this year (in a "down economy")

    In prior years, I've made money off things like running websites, selling them, selling software, building computers, building and selling small businesses, etc.

    One quick example: in 2003 I did some consulting for a recovering "dot com" company and at the time there stock was around ~$5.00. It was a side job, so instead of cash I asked for part of my my pay in stock (as much as they would give me) and also was able to purchase their stock at a discount (using money from my day job). I was able to accumulate quite a bit of shares. I sold about half off for around ~$22 and still have the other half. Their stock is around $27 today. When I sold at $22 I made more on the sale then I did from my full time income that year.

    Another year I had a book deal bring in more income then my day job. All of that extra income goes directly into savings/investments.

    But like I said, there is no "one thing" that has been the "main" contributor. It's been a combination of a lot of smaller things over many years compounded by savings/investing. $25K here, $70K there, $10K there and it starts to add up.

    Reply

  • calor

    calor

    March 10, 2015, 3:19 pm

    I think I sort of understood organic chemistry really well (not anymore, its been decades)... and I tried to cook up Lysergic acid diethylamide ;) It needs low temps and I was running around the school getting ice. Made my chem teacher very suspicious. Its also (in my mind) one of the coolest things Ive ever done...

    A disclaimer: I was very young, very nerdy. I was not successful on the first try and I never tried again. I just checked Wikipedia on what it had to say about it now and I am :) :) :)

    Reply

  • nofuture11

    nofuture11

    March 10, 2015, 10:31 pm

    Like I mentioned, I did my best to avoid everyone and kept from forming any relationships with other inmates. It's best to keep your head down and go unnoticed. From what i've gathered though, depending on your crime, you get some level of respect the day you step in.

    Murderers (of other men, and esp law enforcement) seem to be held in high regard.

    Then come assault, armed robbery. Below them you have your petty thieves, and drug dealers. At the bottom is anyone that committed violence against women or children, and any crimes sexual in nature (doesn't matter if the victim was a child or adult).

    I've heard some people mention that you should join a gang, but I never did, that will only keep you in prison longer.

    Also, no matter how much of a nice guy you were before coming to prison, you do not associate with other races. This is pretty easy to do, because they won't associate with you.

    Reply

  • Marxshmarx

    Marxshmarx

    March 11, 2015, 5:48 am

    I wasn't trying to be impolite. I mean, what did I say that was untrue. Fact the average posted salary for China on Dave's esl cafe when I was looking translated into about 600 dollars a month, for Korea 1800. Fact Korea is fully literate, China is the 85th most literate country in the world. Fact Korea has the fastest internet in the world, China has a government censored firewall. Fact recent events have shown the police in China to be brutal and aggressive (the attack on the Japanese photographers for example and the human rights lawyer, also their policy toward North Korean refugees), Korea barely has police let alone repressive ones. Fact South Korea has the 32nd highest GDP per capita in the world just ahead of New Zealand, China has the 100th highest GDP per capita in the world just behind Angola (IMF statistics). Mandarin is a character driven tonal language, Korean is a phonetically written non-tonal language.

    I don't mean to be confrontational or put China down I'm sure that Shanghai is a really fantastic city. The Great Wall and the Terracotta soldiers are wonders of the world. The Tien Shan looks indescribable, and Tibet is on my absolutely must go see while I'm here list. It's just that the pros and cons of a decision seem pretty heavily weighted in my eyes and that's why I made the decision I made. I just can't imagine what could have outweighed all those pros. I'm sorry I sounded like an asshole on Dave's, but seriously, one ESL guy to another, why?

    Reply

  • Lut3s

    Lut3s

    March 10, 2015, 6:45 am

    Wow, way to be a dick dude.

    Some words of advice that I'm gonna try and infuse into my kids. From being on this green earth for a little over 21 years, I've learned a lot.

    * When it comes time, stand up for yourself and be a man.

    * Respect anyone the first time you meet them, you can learn what kind of person they are later.

    * There is a time and place for diplomacy.

    * Think for yourself, do your research, and don't buy into the fear.

    * Educate yourself.

    * Never stop learning, trust me it won't be hard.

    * Don't be just another 8-5'er unless that's *really* what you want out of life.

    * Take one of your hobbies as a kid and make it a career.

    * Work on your judge of character now and use it to pick your friends.

    * Pick your friends, there's plenty more out there.

    * Find your love and hold 'em close, if it's worth it for both of you, fight to keep it going.

    All I got for now, oh and read that craigslist article, he's smarter than I am.

    Reply

  • twisted2253

    twisted2253

    March 10, 2015, 10:10 pm

    Not sure if you'll need 8GB of ram for 5 clients. And I believe XP will not work out of the box with 8GB of ram, you may have to do some minor hacking to get it to correctly use all of that ram.

    Is this going to be a local server or connected to the internet?

    Personally I would not use Vista, it will probably be a bitch to set up all the account access privileges.

    Ever check out Windows Server Edition? I haven't used the OS since 2003 but I remember it having a bunch of nice little gadgets and tweaks you could do when putting it onto a network.

    PS. I'm no IT professional and I'm sure someone with more knowledge on the matter will chew me out or something, but I did used to host a file storage server over the internet using Windows Server 2003. And also from time to time we would run CS:S servers on it.

    Reply

  • SarahC

    SarahC

    March 10, 2015, 6:23 am

    And kids are beginning to find they have the power to blackmail teachers by accusing them of 'touching' them.

    There were two 14 year old girls in my school - this was back 15 years. They were from broken homes, and listened to no kind of authority.

    When they were actually in school, they were often lying, and even got a teacher in trouble who had given them a detention by retaliating by saying "He touched me"!

    While this kind of child-mentality is rife, male teachers are going to suffer a lot.

    How can you retrain kids who accuse adults of abuse to get revenge? Even expelling them isn't much a problem for these kids...

    Reply

  • smitty22

    smitty22

    March 10, 2015, 6:31 pm

    .45 USP, .38 Revolver, .308 Semi-Auto. Texas. I plan to acquire one rifle and a shotgun to round out my collection.

    I was a military police officer & an Embassy Guard in my youth. There's two realizations justifying firearm ownership as an individual right.

    The first is that the police, by their nature, react to circumstances far more often than they intervene in them; ergo if you're in need of self-defense, you're generally going to have to defend yourself vice letting the police protect you.

    The second is that I received a fair amount of training about the legality and justification for the use of fire arms at the age of 19 and was entrusted with that responsibility. The subject matter of this training was something that most could learn; hence I don't see why I should lose the right to possess a firearm. Put pithily, a badge does not magically make someone capable of being responsible enough to carry a firearm.

    Reply

  • jacques_chester

    jacques_chester

    March 11, 2015, 12:13 am

    This is very common in industry.

    Processes for reigning in chaotic development have been studied, tested and written about for decades at this point. It's fashionable to say that software is impossibly difficult to project manage. But that's not true: a well-run organisation can get project variation down to +/- 20% or less.

    The point is that practices which improve quality, delivery performance etc just aren't used widely in industry. Not even the really simple ones. It's a double failure of education and motivation across two distinct groups.

    Group 1: Developers.

    Developers are never as well-educated about software development *process* as they are about subject matter. For example, Barry Boehm has demonstrated that the third most important influence on the success or failure of a project is the quality of developers. The second is the quality of your requirements analysts.

    That is, non-coding development work is *more important* than coding work. But that's not how the education is run. Computer science is still taught as an undergraduate degree where development process is an afterthought. I have received two full semesters of instruction on data structures and algorithms, including weekly coding assignments. I received 3 weeks on requirements, with no testing except for a question in the final exam.

    So developers tend to be largely ignorant of the vast, deep body of knowledge to do with better software engineering practice. Agile has changed that somewhat, but itself is no silver bullet. On the upside, agile processes are *processes*, defined and described. On the downside, agile has been used almost universally by chaotic chopshops to eschew any process or documentation.

    Agile neatly leads to the problem of motivation. Coders don't get into coding because they want to spend hours and hours talking to clients about their boring problems. People sign up for it because they enjoy coding. They enjoy creative problem solving and doing clever things with computers. Unless you make good process a habit or a condition of employment, it basically won't happen. Very few programmers have disciplined habits; left to their own devices many will return to code-and-fix.

    Group 2: Management.

    Those managers who have been specifically trained in business or management -- MBAs, BComms and the like -- have learned models of business operations which don't really square with software development. Most business literature assumes you are running either a retail outfit, a manufacturer or perhaps a services firm. Software development doesn't really fit into any of these holes. Management degrees don't cover software development process at all, so when developers try to communicate their plans and expectations to management, there is a serious impedance mismatch. This is a well-known and much-lamented curse of our profession.

    Managers also tend to hate process even more than their programmers. To the manager, process is *overhead*, it is something to be reduced in order to save time and money. When the manager takes the project or departmental budget to *his* manager, they will get asked "Why have you budgeted $40,000 for software inspections? Isn't that a waste of time? Why don't they just write the software right in the first place? We can do without it!"

    So between the lack of education for both development and management and the lack of motivation to apply anything learnt, well-run software development organisations are vanishingly rare. If you're serious, try looking for a firm using Scrum* (which is a fairly rigid and descriptive Agile methodology) or perhaps try to get in at a company with at least CMMI-3 certification.

    *Though see views to the contrary in comments below.

    Reply

  • jredbone

    jredbone

    March 10, 2015, 5:43 pm

    A few years ago I had a similar breakdown like OP, and simply had to get away. I did some traveling for 3 years. Of course I had to work and make a living since I'm not wealthy, but it was totally worth it. I finally got back home in July and I feel like a new man. I'm a bit worried with finding work, but I am not stressed out anymore nor am I bothered by little things that used to send me off the deep end.

    We spend so much time on prescription pills and/or self-medication when sometimes we just need to take a walk, a really, really long walk.

    Reply

  • InfinitelyThirsting

    InfinitelyThirsting

    March 10, 2015, 4:01 pm

    I am a girl who doesn't come easily either. Keep practicing on yourself. Practice more than once or twice a week. Get it down. Figure out how to make it better. It wasn't until college that I could get myself off without a vibrator; now, I most of the time prefer to use just my hands.

    As for sex. Only one person has ever brought me to orgasm, and like you, it was never because of lack of trying, or skill. When it first finally happened, I was half asleep, and he wasn't really trying hard, just kind of lazily playing with me, but not actually trying to make me come. Light touches. The combination made it happen. And once it finally happened, it's been able to happen again. Still requires lighter, repetitive touches (which are not what turns me on to make me want to fuck, by the way, you might have a similar difference), and if it's been a while since I came from him, it takes longer. It had gotten to a more normal amount of time (15-20 minutes, instead of forty) for a while, but we've been limited.

    So. My suggestion is to first get yourself off more often. Do it at least every day. Then, figure out what really does it for you, and how to help things go faster. For me, taking brief but regular pauses, rather than continuous stimulation, it's like it makes my body hungry for more, and so helps speed things up. Then, just keep playing with your boyfriend, but lose the goal. Make sure he knows that you're still enjoying yourself (I'm assuming you are). And don't ever expect to get off from vaginal penetration; it's unlikely. Just let him finger you a lot, while watching movies, or sleeping, or whatever, without the goal. Eventually, it might happen. And if and when it does, work up to trying it with oral. I can come from both now.

    Still haven't orgasmed from vaginal alone, yet. I feel like I might be able to, but it requires a lot of speed from my partner, and it makes me scream a lot beforehand (the good kind), and in the moment I always just want him to come, hahaha. It's hard for him not to when I'm screaming for him to. But I never feel unfulfilled or anything, so I don't really care. Sex and orgasms are two rather different things for me; an orgasm, even from a partner, will not fulfill a sex craving, and sex very easily fulfills me and leaves me feeling great without orgasms.

    tl; dr - Diddle yourself more, make your body learn to come, remove the pressure, and don't expect it. And never forget that sex =/= orgasm.

    Reply

  • SarahC

    SarahC

    March 10, 2015, 9:55 am

    And kids are beginning to find they have the power to blackmail teachers by accusing them of 'touching' them.

    There were two 14 year old girls in my school - this was back 15 years. They were from broken homes, and listened to no kind of authority.

    When they were actually in school, they were often lying, and even got a teacher in trouble who had given them a detention by retaliating by saying "He touched me"!

    While this kind of child-mentality is rife, male teachers are going to suffer a lot. How can you retrain kids who accuse adults of abuse to get revenge? Even expelling them isn't much a problem for these kids...

    Reply

  • ziegfried

    ziegfried

    March 11, 2015, 12:56 am

    > They feel my withdrawl is about them, but I dont want to bother them.

    You have *got* to bother them - do you see how many "random" redditors want to give you their best to help you through this crisis? Your friends would want to help you even more.

    We redditors don't always know the right things to say -- but we care. So do your friends -- give them a chance in your hour of need.

    I don't know what to say to you except I care a great deal what happens to you. Depressed people don't think clearly, and think that no one cares, when in fact many people are devastated by the loss.

    So it's important to correct your thinking -- almost anyone would be depresssed in your situation -- you lost your father, you are living with a grieving mother, you went through a divorce, you're not happy with your job or relationship. Being depressed about all this is normal!

    What's not normal is killing yourself over it. Please be compassionate to yourself -- you are going through some really hard times right now - don't beat yourself up over it, and please please don't kill yourself over it. Love yourself -- you know that us redditors would shower you with all kinds of love if we could.

    Please be there for yourself, be there for your friends, and start making changes in your life -- go on a trip, get away from an environment that reminds you of what's wrong in your life.

    I saw on reddit that there is a way for people to go and work on organic farms as a way to travel cheaply -- would that be something that would appeal to you? New surroundings help us to be able to choose new feelings, rather than triggering the same negative feelings all the time. You can still be with nature and animals, but it's a way to start your life new and fresh -- what do you think?

    Reply

  • superiority

    superiority

    March 10, 2015, 11:35 pm

    Have you read **The Iron Dream**, by Norman Spinrad? It's based on the conceit that Adolf Hitler, as a young man, emigrated to America and became a science fiction author. The book claims to be a reprint of his (Hugo award-winning) most famous and popular work, *Lord of the Swastika*, in which a young man returns to his homeland after years of exile only to find it overrun with mutants who have taken over the country and enslaved the population. He rallies the people, and exterminates the mutants. The point is to be a critique of the paternalist, authoritarian, and occasionally downright fascist themes that are common in science fiction (cf. Heinlein). At the back of the book there is a "critical essay", just in case anybody didn't get the joke. Anyway, one of the passages in said essay reads:

    > Indeed, in the book Hitler seems to assume that masses of men in fetishistic uniforms marching in precise displays and displaying phallic gestures and paraphernalia will have a powerful appeal to ordinary human beings. Feric Jaggar comes to power in Heldon through little more than a grotesque series of increasingly grandiose phallic displays. This is undoubtedly phallic fetishism on the part of the author, since the alternative conclusion is to accept the ridiculous notion that an entire nation would throw itself at the feet of a leader simply on the basis of mass displays of public fetishism, orgies of blatant phallic symbolism, and mass rallies enlivened with torchlight and rabid oratory. Obviously, such a mass national psychosis could never occur in the real world; Hitler's assumption that it not only could happen but would be an expression of so-called racial will proves that he himself was suffering from such a malady.

    Reply

  • ithkuil

    ithkuil

    March 10, 2015, 11:46 pm

    You said you viewed the video, so I thought that would be the reference, or the PDF I linked. You said that Joseph couldn't talk on economics, then said you agreed with what he said about fiscal manipulation.

    This is actually a continuation and detailing of what we were discussing from the beginning of course. The problems are fundamental.

    These are Joseph's or Fresco's theories, not my own, but I have yet to find a significant rebuttal for these arguments, and would very much appreciate any you can offer here.

    ***

    ##The Need for Cyclical Consumption

    The Employee performs tasks for the Employer in exchange for a “Wage” or monetary payment,

    while the employer sells a good or service to the Consumer for a “Profit”- another classification of

    monetary payment.

    In turn, both the Employer and Employee function as Consumers, for the monetary payments

    (“wages” and “profits”) they obtain are used to purchase goods and services relevant to their survival.

    The act of purchasing goods and services, which is the role of the Consumer, is what allows the

    Employer to make its “Profit”, while also enabling the payment of the Employee’s “Wage”.

    In other words, it is the requirement of perpetual ‘Consumption’ that keeps the Employer in business

    and maintains the Employee’s job.

    Now, it is important to understand that this payment-consumption cycle (or ‘cyclical consumption’)

    cannot stop, or the entire economic structure would collapse, for money would not come to the

    Employer, the Employer would not be able to afford to pay his Employee, and both the Employer

    and Employee would not be able to perpetuate the cycle by being a Consumer.

    Consequence:

    #1 - Nothing physically produced can ever maintain an operational lifespan longer than what can

    be endured in order to maintain economic integrity through ‘cyclical consumption’.

    #2- The introduction of new products and services must be constant to offset any increased

    efficiency of the prior generations of production, regardless of functional utility, generating

    endless waste.

    ***

    ##The Abundance of Scarcity

    In Monetary Economics, the notion of “Supply and Demand” is a well-known construct, simply

    denoting that ‘the more there is of something, the less it is worth in respect to itself’’. For example,

    drinking water was historically a very abundant resource, which didn’t typically require payment for

    its consumption in a commercial sense. However, as pollution of the water table and city water

    systems have developed, filtered drinking water is now being commercially sold, often at a higher

    price than oil per gallon. In other words, it is profitable for resources to be scarce. If a company can

    convince the public that their product is “rare”, the more they can charge for that product. This

    provides a strong motivation to keep their items scarce. On yet another level, it should be pointed out

    that the central banks of nearly all countries also create scarcity within the money supply itself in

    order to keep pressure on the market system. Bernard Lietaer, designer of the EU currency system

    points out:

    “Greed and Competition are not the result of immutable human temperament…greed and fear of scarcity are in fact

    being continuously created and amplified as a direct result of the kind of money we are using…We can produce more

    than enough food to feed everybody…but there is clearly not enough money to pay for it all. The scarcity is in our

    national currencies. In fact, the job of the central banks is to create and maintain that currency scarcity. The direct

    consequence is that we have to fight with each other in order to survive.”

    The ramifications of this abundance of scarcity are nothing but detrimental. If profit can be made as a

    result of scarcity generated by environmental pollution, then this creates a sick reinforcement of

    indifference to environmental concern. If companies know they can make more money by having

    their resources or products remain scarce, how can a world of abundance ever occur? It can’t, for the

    corporation will be motivated to create the scarcity if need be. In turn, the scarcity created in the

    money supply itself by the central banks compounds the motivation for us to compete with each

    other, generating an ethic-less, primitive tribalism with everyone out for themselves, producing

    human stress, conflict and illness.

    ***

    ##The Priority of Profit

    A monetary system’s foremost motivating principle is Profit, or the acquisition of money through

    the exploitation of others. All players in the game must, in order to survive, seek out a strategy to

    acquire income. A “wage” earner seeks out the best possible pay he can get for his services, while the

    Employer (owner/producer) seeks to constantly reduce costs in order to maximize profit. This is the

    dominant “mentality” in a Monetary System and those who are in positions of great wealth (material

    “success”) are often the most ruthless. While many people who favor the profit system will talk

    endlessly about their “ethical” standards in regard to their practices, history has shown that the

    priority of profit is actually a sickness which is not only poisoning our personal/social well-being and

    standards of living, but also the environment on which we rely for virtually everything we need as a

    species.

    However, before we begin with the negative consequences resulting from this ‘mentality’, let us

    consider what many think to be the good side of this profit priority – “Incentive”.

    As the theory goes, the need for profit provides a person/organization with motivation to work on

    new ideas/products that would sell in the market place. In other words, the assumption is that if

    people were not motivated by their need to survive through profit, little social progress would be

    achieved.

    ..

    Consequence:

    The psychological/sociological ramifications resulting from the priority of profit are of grave

    proportions when it comes to the conduct of human beings. In fact, an entire structure of imposed

    control has been created in order to deal with the never-ending problems associated with the need for

    survival by way of gain/profit/income - The Legal System. While non-monetary related crimes, often

    born from ego, jealousy, emotional deprivation and other psychological issues are currently a

    problem, the frequency of non-monetary related crimes are nothing in comparison to the crimes

    committed that are motivated by the acquisition of money and property. In fact, if we define

    “Crime” as ‘Corruption’ and define “Corruption” as “Moral Perversion; Dishonesty”, then an entirely

    new perspective comes into play, for, if you look closely enough, you will see that nearly every act of

    strategic monetary gain is corrupt by its very construct…it is just accepted as ‘normal’ by the

    conditioned culture to whatever degree is deemed tolerable by consensus.

    ***

    ##The Distortion of Values

    Our Beliefs and Values are shaped by culture. While there is a genetic basis to certain human

    attributes and behaviors, the knowledge we have and the way we think about and act upon that

    knowledge is fundamentally an environmental phenomenon.

    With that in mind, the monetary system requires a form of communication to inform the public of

    what a company has made available for sale. This form of communication is termed ‘advertising’.

    The characteristic of advertising is ‘promotion’ and promotion is a manner of communication, which,

    generally speaking, creates a bias in favor of the product in question. In other words, advertising’s job

    is to entice…or in more direct terms – manipulate the consumer into purchasing a product. This

    manipulation takes many forms, but one of the most effective is the manipulation and/or exploitation

    of the viewing audience’s “values” - what he or she finds important.

    However, before we go any further, it needs to be pointed out that the mass consumption patterns

    currently seen in the United States and elsewhere were not always the case. America originally was

    founded, to some degree, on a kind of Protestant work ethic, where thrift and savings were dominant

    values. However, by the early 20th century, a concerted effort by the business community set out to

    distort these notions and mold a new army of impulsive, perpetually dissatisfied, status conscious

    consumers. Advertising agencies switched their arguments from utilitarian ones to those gauged for

    emotional appeal and status. Consequently, today the average American consumes twice as much as

    he or she did since the end of WWII.

    Now, one of the most powerful forms of ‘value manipulation’ comes from re-associating a person’s

    identity to a particular ideal. Patriotism and Religion are classical examples of this, for through

    indoctrination at an early age, a person is often conditioned to feel a close personal connection to a

    country or religion, hence conditioning that person to want to support the doctrines, unconditionally.

    ...

    In the end, our values are based on what works and helps us create easier, better lives. If we live in a

    system that rewards competition, unenlightened self-interest, corruption, vanity and arrogance, then

    these are the values that will constantly be perpetuated in society. While many people give lip service

    to ‘honesty, caring for others and humility’, it is easy to see why these qualities do not prevail, for the

    system of survival in society today does not support or reinforce them.

    Reply

  • essentials

    essentials

    March 10, 2015, 10:59 pm

    Well thats just is, we are extremely close and I dont feel that there is anything missing from it. If I felt at all like he was distant from me, I would have left along time ago. Its actually SURPRISING to me that hes NOT attracted to me because of how we are together... hold hands in public, make out all the time, hold each other, make love pretty regularly, have showers together, etc etc.

    It's more like... he saw himself with a certain type of girl and while i'm everything he's ever wanted, i;m not the body shape he expected. He clearly can live with it.

    I find myself attractive and I've always had a good self esteem but I don't like my weight, I've tried many times to lose it (diets, change of eating habits, exercise, gyms, etc) but its hard. It's not something that's ever going to be guaranteed. It may even be a health problem because no matter what I do I can't seem to lose anything. My weight doesn't get me down, somedays I even love my 'curves'.

    Reply

  • familynight

    familynight

    March 10, 2015, 11:25 pm

    Excluding DIPAs (kinda funny since Blind Pig is often considered the first commercial DIPA - the style guidelines have changed), here are my favorite IPAs, in loose order:

    Ballast Point - Sculpin

    Russian River - Blind Pig

    AleSmith - IPA

    Port - High Tide Fresh Hop IPA

    Sierra Nevada - Estate Brewers Harvest Ale

    For a good IPA, there's often a huge difference between fresh and even slightly old. Russian River puts bottling dates on Pliny and Blind Pig, and I'm now loath to buy either more than 6 weeks out (I'm terribly spoiled). I think this is also one of the reasons that some of the bigger, nationally distributed IPAs and DIPAs get slammed, sometimes. Stone IPA can be just about top five for me, but it can also be nothing special. You just don't know what you're getting, unless you talk to the store's buyer and they're honest with you.

    I've also had some top-rated IPAs from other parts of the country via trade, Surly Furious, Town Hall's Masala Mama, Bells Two Hearted, and they were good, but they might be the best thing ever fresh out of a tap at the brewery. Anyway, my list is all California probably because I live in California and have tried them all very fresh. Sorry to ramble.

    Reply

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